Global Methane Forum Presentations – China Waste Session

Over the coming weeks Methane International will feature presentations from the 2016 Global Methane Forum. First out of the gate is a set of presentations from the plenary session China’s Food Waste and Sludge Management Practices, Challenges, and Lessons Learned held on 29 March 2016. This session provided presentations and a panel discussion about current practices, challenges, and lessons learned for managing organic waste in China.

GMI-DGZhang-LijinZhong-TomF
Panel members at the discussion following the session’s presentations. Left to right: Ms. Lijin Zhong of the World Resources Institute; Mr. Zhang Yue, Director General of the Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development; and Mr. Tom Frankiewicz,  U.S. EPA and chair of GMI’s Municipal Solid Waste Subcommittee.

Mr. Zhang Yue, Director General of the Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development

Director-General Zhang delivered a keynote address highlighting organic waste management challenges and successes in China. His talk introduced the audience to the state of affairs of waste management in China, setting the stage for the sector-specific presentations that followed. DG Zhang closed his remarks with a vision for “greening” Chinese cities through low carbon waste practices. He emphasized the connection between urban municipal solid waste and wastewater treatment and methane emissions and the opportunities for reducing these emissions in China.

 

Sing (Terry) Cho, Senior Water & Sanitation Specialist with the World Bank

GMI-terry-cho
Terry Cho presenting on the World Bank’s recent projects around wastewater management in Chinese urban areas.

Terry presented the results of a recently completed project on urban wastewater sewage sludge management in China, and summarized international best practices in sludge management. Currently, China mostly lacks advanced sludge management treatment but conditions are favorable for the introduction of new technologies and practices, particularly anaerobic digestion, and especially if incorporated into urban management plans. Terry closed by outlining some of the components of the World Bank’s recommended guidelines for developing an effective sludge management master plan for China.

 

 

Lijin Zhong, China Water Lead, and Vijay Jagannathan, Senior Fellow, with the World Resources Institute

GMI-vijay_wri
The World Resources Institute’s Vijay Jagannathan presenting sludge-to-energy case studies.

Lijin and Vijay highlighted the importance of viewing waste as a resource and highlighted successful case studies of organic sludge-to-energy projects in China. Presentation and summary coming soon!

 

Li Yong, International Marketing Manager with Bioland Group

Li offered a private sector perspective on the challenges and opportunities for food waste management in China. She started with a general overview of the food waste market in China: the country currently produces more than 30 million tonnes of food waste per year, of which only about 30% is recycled. Food waste management faces several challenges in China, such as safe collection and sorting practices, frequent disconnect with local authorities, and a lack of new technology and efficient management systems. She highlighted as a case study example the new Bioland Food Waste Treatment Project in Nanning, China. Fully cooperating with municipal authorities to ensure a steady waste stream, the new project utilizes state-of-the-art technology to ensure efficient organic waste sorting, recycling, and anaerobic digestion of more than 200 tonnes of food waste per day, and produces biogas-upgraded compressed natural gas, fertilizer, and clean water.

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