GMI to Attend to UK AD & Biogas 2016

show2016exhibitor728x90_animThe Global Methane Initiative will be exhibiting at the United Kingdom’s Anaerobic Digestion & Biogas 2016 (UK AD & Biogas 2016, or ADBA)  on 6 and 7 July in Birmingham, UK.

This event will bring together the world’s leading international technology and product suppliers under one roof, along with some of the most engaging and knowledgeable minds in the industry. For more information, visit their website or check out this great video about the conference:

The event will be an exciting time for everyone involved in our industry. In addition to the Trade Show, there is a 2-day conference and seminar program, with speakers from across the globe discussing broad topics as well as practical ‘how-to’ sessions that will help everyone run their businesses more effectively.

We’ll be posting more information about the agenda and speakers in the coming weeks until the conference. In the meantime, registration is still open, and the conference is free to attend. If you can make it, don’t forget to visit GMI’s booth: stand C604!

 

GMI Visits Biogas Facilities in China

Earlier this week we shared a post by a blogger in China about a sludge-to-energy project that GMI supports. As it turns out, GMI Municipal Solid Waste Subcommittee Chair Tom Frankiewicz – among other staff – was recently in China, working on a host of biogas projects (including that one). Check out below some photos from sites on his itinerary!

Liumingying Biogas Supply Plant

china1-3Started in 1991, the Liumingying Biogas Supply Plant uses chicken manure in anaerobic digesters to create biogas that is supplied to seven nearby villages for cooking gas. The villages maintain the biogas plant operations, and each household receives a cooktop for using the biogas to prepare meals.

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Tom and Dr. Heinz-Peter Mang, biogas technical expert, inspect tanks used to store biogas for distribution to the villages (above). The biogas plant also uses digestate to produce compost that is used in agriculture (below).

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Beijing Century Green Environmental Engineering & Technology Ltd. (CGEET)

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Tour of the GCEET sludge treatment and utilization plant. Treated sludge is turned into compost that is used in urban landscaping.

 

CANFIT Resource Recovery

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Tom and delegates from Senegal observe a model of the CANFIT Resource Recovery facility located in Beijing. Mr. J.C. Yu, President of CANFIT, explains how waste products like sludge and discarded organic waste are turned into beneficial products (i.e., compost, biogas, biochar, biodiesel and biomethane) for sale to customers. The facility serves over 4 million inhabitants and plans are underway for expansion of the facility to accept more discarded waste for use in beneficial products.

May News Round-Up

A mish-mash of methane news this May!

First, a little self-promotion: our own Felicia Ruiz and Raymond C. Pilcher (Raven Ridge) penned a piece on coal bed methane and coal mine methane development in Mongolia for World Coal. Check it out!

There was a lot of attention on cows this month – specifically on their belches, flatulence, and manure that are key sources of methane emissions. We here at GMI advocate capturing the methane from cow manure through anaerobic digestion to use as biogas, but an entrepreneurial Italian took our advice a step further – to use the remaining de-methanated concoction as a raw material to make plaster, bricks and other objects known as merdacotta, or literally, ‘baked poop.’. Meanwhile, scientists in other parts of the world are attempting to tackle methane emissions that result from enteric fermentation, from feeding the cows hops or a compound called 3-nitrooxypropanol to reduce methane emissions from digestion. Indians are taking a different approach by studying miniature Vechur cows for their dairy production needs that release only 10% the level of methane emissions of a normal-sized cow.

The United States made a big announcement: new regulations that will target emissions from new or modified oil and gas wells. The New Republic and Washington Post followed up with analytical think pieces on the importance of methane mitigation and why the impact of methane emissions can be confusing. Vox published an explainer that describes the new U.S. regulations within the larger context of U.S. climate pledges.

Finally, two methane mentions this month outside our usual spectrum: 1) Swedish researchers are developing clothes that would be able to absorb methane from the ambient atmosphere, and 2) Rwanda inaugurated a power plant that uses a natural methane emissions source found in its Lake Kivu.

…Until June!

P.S. If you didn’t see it, the Climate Lab Book created a compellingspiral2016-2 infographic that shows global temperature change since 1850. Worth keeping!

 

May Methane News Round-Up

April News Round-Up

On April 22nd (Earth Day), world leaders from 175 countries signed the historic Paris climate accord, drawing attention to some of the world’s most pressing environmental issues – including methane.

The issue of food waste received a lot of attention during the month. According to Reuters, between 30 and 40 percent of food produced around the world is never eaten, because it spoils after harvest and during transportation or is thrown away by shops or consumers. Reuters’ report focused on a new study that concluded up to 14 percent of emissions from agriculture in 2050 could be avoided by managing food use and distribution better. The Washington Post also described different countries’ efforts to target this problem, from a bill in the UK that proposes targets for manufacturers and distributors to reduce certain food waste to an effort in California to change the wording on the expiration dates on packaged food to prevent consumers from throwing away products that are still safe to eat. Meanwhile, two articles detail anaerobic digestion projects in Colorado, USA and northwestern England that capture methane emissions from food waste.

Another big story was the upward revision of methane emissions from the oil & gas sector in the United States, surpassing ruminant livestock as the largest source of methane emissions. As the Aliso Canyon methane leak demonstrated, one of the greatest hurdles to reducing methane emissions is plugging leaks in the storage tanks, pipes, and other equipment that drillers use to extract and transport oil and gas. A Washington Post story delves in depth on whether the rise of U.S. methane emissions can be attributed to the oil & gas sector, featuring the Climate and Clean Air Coalition’s Drew Shindell. In northern Texas, so-called ‘methane sleuths’ have taken the initiative to monitor emissions from oil and gas drilling in the area.

Finally, Canada’s Global News reports on why it’s so critical to capture methane from coal mines – don’t forget to view the video.

April Methane News Round-Up

 

#GMF2016 Day 2: Methane Policies and Re-charter Ceremony

Hello again from the Global Methane Forum conference site at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.! We had an incredibly successful concluding day of the Global Methane Initiative portion of this week’s proceedings.

The morning session on country-level methane policies featured the approach of five countries toward methane policy, with representatives:

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Breakout of SCLP policy measures and best practices.
  • Canada: Mike Beale, Assistant Deputy Minister, Environmental Stewardship Branch, Environment and Climate Change Canada;
  • Colombia: Eduardo Sanchez, Climate Change Advisor, Ministry of Mines and Energy;
  • Mexico: Maria Amparo Martínez, Institute of Ecology and Climate Change;
  • Philippines: Emmanuel de Guzman, Secretary of Climate Change, Climate Change Commission; and
  • United States: Rick Duke, Deputy Director for Climate Policy, White House Office of Energy and Climate Change.

The key take-away from the policy session was that policies to mitigate methane are not one-size-fits-all, and depend upon the key methane sources in each country and the various levels of government’s willingness and capacity to address these sources.

Following the policy roundtable, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency launched its latest methane-focused voluntary effort in the oil & gas sector, the Methane Challenge. The Methane Challenge will provide partner companies with a platform to make company-wide commitments to cut emissions from sources within their operations by implementing a suite of best management practices within 5 years. Representatives from 41 companies from across the value chain participated in the ceremony with EPA Acting Assistant Administrator in the Office of Air, Janet McCabe.

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U.S. EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy delivering a keynote presentation at the Global Methane Forum. 

After the Methane Challenge launch, participants were treated to a keynote by the passionate, feisty EPA Administrator, Gina McCarthy. Administrator McCarthy spoke about the value of methane mitigation in terms of environmental, health, and economic benefits, and how voluntary partnerships like GMI play an integral role.

 

“So much of our success to date has been possible because of the leadership and cooperation of the international community. When it comes to global challenges like climate change, partnerships and collaborations that can bridge national interests and bring us together are really the core, essential, ingredient for success,” she said.

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Finally – the event we here at GMI had been awaiting – GMI’s Re-charter ceremony that officially extends GMI’s charter by a further 5 years, and formalizes new alliances with the Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC) and United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE). The ceremony featured speeches from GMI, CCAC, and UNECE by Joe Goffman, Associate Administrator and Senior Counsel, Office of Air and Radiation, U.S. EPA; Rita Cerutti, Director, Multilateral Affairs, Environment and Climate Change Canada and Co-chair, CCAC Working Group; and Christian Friis Bach, Executive Secretary, UNECE, respectively.

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Following another afternoon of intense sector-focused technical and policy sessions in the biogas, coal mines, and oil & gas sectors, participants finally got to indulge in some socializing and networking at the official reception hosted by the U.S. State Department. We would like to thank supporters FLSmidth and GHGSat for their assistance in providing libations to all Forum participants at this reception.

Thank you to our 500+ participants of the Global Methane Forum! Presentations from the sessions will be available in a few weeks on our website. Stay posted to our Twitter account for the latest happenings during the rest of the week. Moving on to the CCAC Science & Policy Dialogue today…

#GMF2016 Day 1: Importance of Methane Mitigation and Methane Project Financing

Hello from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., USA, where we have just completed the first morning plenary session of the Global Methane Forum! We had a packed house of methane mitigation enthusiasts ready to discover the importance of mitigating methane as part of a near- and long-term strategy for implementing the COP21 goal of limiting global warming below 2 degrees Celsius.

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A packed house before the first Plenary Session of the 2016 Global Methane Forum. Photo credit: Christopher Voell, Director of the U.S. EPA’s AgSTAR program and Co-Chair of GMI’s Agriculture Subcommittee.

The first session kicked off with a talk by GMI Steering Committee Chair & Acting Assistant Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Janet McCabe on methane’s critical role as a short-term climate forcer and the global cooperative efforts on its mitigation, including the Global Methane Initiative. She also detailed U.S. domestic plans for methane mitigation in the oil & gas sector, including the recent announcement with the government of Canada. Her talk was followed by a complementary discussion on the outcomes of COP21 and the implications of future methane work by the U.S. State Department’s Deputy Special Envoy for Climate Change, Karen Florini. Ms. Florini also acts as a key player in the Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC), the co-host of the Forum.

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In a panel of technical experts on coal mine methane, Scott Foster of the United Nations’ Economic Commission for Europe called for increased international cooperation. Photo credit: GMI project staff.

As the policymakers exited the stage, the scientists entered – CCAC’s Climate Advisory Panel scientists Dr. Johan Kuylenstierna, Deputy Director, Stockholm Environment Institute, University of York, and Dr. Drew Shindell, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University. In a ‘tag team’ talk, Dr. Kuylenstierna and Dr. Shindell explained the far-reaching impacts of methane emissions not only as a climate forcer, but on air quality as well – which negatively impacts human health, agricultural crop yields, etc.

The final session of the morning featured a roundtable moderated by Dianne Rudo, during which the speakers detailed varying approaches to methane project financing, including:

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Steven Wan speaking on financing Ventilation Air Methane (VAM) projects after the collapse of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). Photo Credit: GMI project staff.
  • Steven Wan, Fortman (Beijing) Clean Technology Co., Ltd., discussed establishing a public-private partnership with SinoSteel to finance coal mine methane projects.
  • Scott Cantor, Carbon Finance Specialist, World Bank described the World Bank’s new innovative, award-winning climate finance mechanism, the Pilot Auction Facility, based on providing a price guarantee for methane projects via auctioning put options.
  • Samuel Tumiwa, Deputy Regional Director, Asian Development Bank, outlined approaches to climate project financing in Asia, including smaller scale, easily replicated loans used to add biogas digesters to existing projects.
  • Laurence Blandford, Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP), presented on his recently-published CCAP paper on converting COP21 INDCs into action. The major takeaway: publishing a country INDC investment strategy.
  • Bob Ichord, Ichord Ventures, LLC, discussed improving enabling environments for mitigating methane emissions from the oil & gas sector. As he noted, oil and gas production will not cease anytime soon, so we must deal with the emissions.

All in all, a successful morning. Stay tuned to our Twitter page for live updates, and please check our website in a few weeks for presentation materials from this morning.

Global Methane Forum Speaker Highlights – Ricardo Hamdan

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Ricardo Hamdan, North America Sales Manager, Greenlane Biogas

Ricardo Hamdan has nearly a decade of experience in renewable natural gas and biogas technology. He is currently the Sales Manager for North America for Greenlane Biogas in Vancouver, Canada, where he has been instrumental in the sale and completion of a broad array of biogas projects around the world, including landfills, wastewater treatment plants, and large-scale animal waste digesters. At the Global Methane Forum, Mr. Hamdan will present on Small Scale Biogas Upgrading Case Studies.

Founded in 1986 in Auckland, New Zealand, Greenlane Biogas is one of the world’s largest suppliers of biogas upgrading technology, including biogas to biomethane. Greenlane Biogas is an independent technology solution provider, offering water wash systems, pressure swing adsorption and membrane systems to clients of all sizes, from small-scale installations to extensive district and industrial biomethane facilities (input rates between 50 and 2500 cubic meters per hour). The two largest biogas-upgrading plants in the world—at Güstrow, Germany and Montreal, Canada—use Greenlane’s pressurized water scrubbing systems.

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Greenlane Biogas TOTARA biogas upgrading equipment.

Mr. Hamdan speaks regularly on topics relating to anaerobic digestion, biogas upgrading and renewable natural gas policy and regulation. He is an active member of the American Biogas Council and the Biogas Association of Canada. He has spoken at several global industry conferences, including the BioCycle Conference, the Global Methane Initiative’s Methane Expo, and the Latin American Carbon Forum.